Making

Get To Know: Our Signature Prints

Every culture has a story to share, and the tradition of storytelling through print has been around for centuries. We work with a curative philosophy inspired by tradition, as we believe that the cultural history of every nation is tied to their textile heritage. It speaks to the reason why we source heritage prints from the archives of our artisan communities, so we can continue the craft and continue telling the story in a modern manner.

These prints have their own individual stories, and we can’t pick favourites (we love them all), but here are some prints that stand out because of the story they tell.

Mobi

The unique Mobi print combines clean lines and an organic pattern, referring to the growth and harvest of the cotton bol. The elegant simplicity of this unique repeat print has its origins in the Meghval community, a peace-loving tribe traditionally engaged in the handloom weaving of cotton. It resembles a ripe cotton bol bursting open, and is always represented with three petals. A combination of clean lines in an organic pattern, it calls to mind growth and the season of harvest.

Shop the Sideswept Dhoti + Mobi Nomad Blue (Organic Cotton) here.  

Leharia

The geometric Leharia print combines strength and grace in its regularity. Named for the waveforms that crash against the shore, it is inspired by a monsoon story of love. As the story goes, women would wear pink Leharia saris into monsoon festivals and dance in the streets; if the pink colour came off on your skin, you’d be loved forever.

Shop the Leharia Charcoal (Organic Cotton) Matching Set here.   

Trikora

The Trikora triangle is a foundation piece of this motif, its up-facing three-sided shape usually symbolises stability with the elements of earth and water. With inspiration from the Kangura print, the motif was traditionally used as a border design for Rajasthani houses, as a sign of protection and defense of loved ones.

Shop the Sideswept Dhoti + Trikora here.  

IChing

The IChing print features Fire and Water, two elements that oppose and balance each other. While Fire symbolises careful thought and precaution, Water is a soulful flow that freely transforms into its different states. In its interpretation, one is precise and calculated while the other is carefree and spontaneous. As told in its intended context, the two are siblings; though contrasting in nature, they complement each other in union. This motif lead us to our and our artisan partner’s largest block yet.

Shop the IChing Matching Set here.

Kirana

This edition features woven motifs from the old archives of our ikat partners, prints with stories lost over time. Kirana is a repeat of a moonbeam, reimagined against a calm mid-summer night with clear skies and a bright monochrome full moon with stars, a time of peace and tranquility that reign over the lands.

Shop the All Day Jumpsuit + Kirana here.

Philippines

Triangles usually denote rice sheaves or man made daggers and sharp teeth, protecting the person with this cloth. The spectacularly bold motif is designed by Anya Lim from Anthill Fabric Gallery as part of the Then&There edition. Its geometrical, angular rhythm is inspired by the Philippines’ namesake as the Sunshine Nation, the rays on the sun in the national flag and carvings on a local gong called Kulintang.

Shop the Modern Monpe + Philippines Teal here.

 

All prints hail from an existing heritage motif tied to a place and time, and our reinterpretation of the motifs is the way we want to continue the existing narrative. The best way to do that is to work with the people who understand not only how to do the craft, but why it’s done. The artisans we work with acquired their skills from the generations before them – they know their history and live it, everyday. For them, the story isn’t just in the motif, but the journey from learning about the craft to creating it, and to fully appreciate and understand the techniques.


Let us know which print means the most to you in the comments below.